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Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Needle Fear

I don't know what to do... it is getting harder and harder to give Elise her shots these days. She's fine once the needle is in, but it sure is a tough ride getting there. I usually sit her on my knee, facing sideways, the leg or arm that I'm going to inject on the outside. As soon as I pick up the needle she starts to cry and yell, "Noooooo, owie!" It's heart-breaking.

I've ended up scratching her with the needle because as I'm trying to inject her, she'll get an arm loose and swipe at the needle. I've even been poked a few times. I just don't have enough arms to try and hold her still.

It's so weird because up until now, it was quite easy to give her the shots. I don't know what has changed.

As I said, she's fine once the needle is in; she'll sit and watch and even count to five with me, exclaiming, "All done!" when I take the needle out. The hardest spot is her leg (we only inject her in her arms or legs at this point); it's becoming almost impossible for me to do it by myself. And since I'm alone for most of her shots, I'm running out of ideas and tiring of these daily wrestling matches.

7 comments:

  1. Oh, Joanne, my heart is aching for you. I have tears in my eyes thinking about you and Elise.
    Everytime one of my kids has to get their vaccinations at the doctors and it usually turns into some kind of screaming/yelling/hiding drama, I think of kids with JD and their parents who do this day in and day out two or three times every day. No breaks. No days off. Every single meal.
    I still have vivid memories with my brother and sister and what went on before mealtimes. My little sister especially, from ages 7-10. I know it caused so much tension for my parents. I mean, my mom is trying to make dinner and get it on the table for 4 kids, 2 of whom are JD so it can't be just anything, which is hard enough, and then at the same time needing to finger prick and then give the shot. I can remember my sister always crying and my mom getting upset telling my dad he needed to be more affectionate with her; he probably just wanted to get it done and over with because the emotion was so high...
    I know I am rambling...and not offering any help...I am sorry :(
    I will say this though! Somewhere down the road there will be a little light. My brother (diagnosed in 6th grade) would not give himself shots, even though at that age they encouraged it. But he wouldn't. Then the next summer, he went to a week away summer camp for JD kids. They always hang a flag at half staff at the beginning of the camp. Their goal is for all the boys to be able to give themselves a shot by the end of camp, and they say if you do, the flag will be at full height when the parents come at the end of the week. I can still remember my mom's emotion coming back at the end of the week when she saw the flag all the way flying, and knew he had really done it...and would keep doing it...and still doing it...at age 33 now...
    I met a lady at the walk last summer who had twin boys diagnosed at 9 months. They were 4 and she said in the next few months, they were going to get the pump and she thought that would help a lot. Do they have plans for that for Elise in the future? I know it doesn't solve anything but might help.

    I am long-winded, but you read my blog, you know that. Just know I care. :)

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  2. Man Joanne, I'm so sorry. I can't even imagine the heartache each and every day. I'm just sorry. I'm going to pray for easier shots, and some day a better solution.

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  3. Awww :( I cant imagine how stressful that is on you (well yeah I can imagine because I know how much it hurts me when I hurt Kacey and she's 9!) I dont have any suggestions to help make it better but I wanted you to know I was thinking of you :) Has the doc made any mention of the insulin pump yet?

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  4. @ Maria - thanks... I don't know how your Mom did it, she must have amazing patience. Someone told me off a 4 year old who does their own injections. I'm hoping Elise will be able to do it at 2! My heart also goes out to the Mom with the twins dx'd at 9 months. I cannot imagine. Thanks again for the sweet words.

    @ Val - Thanks for your prayers, I need them, especially on days like today!

    @ Jill - Our doc hasn't put anyone as little as Elise on a pump yet, although she's not against it if that's what we want. I just don't think I'm ready. I've been reading your posts about "Herbie" and I can't imagine how hard it would be to do a site change on Elise. We're interested in pumping, just not yet.

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  5. I don't know anything to say except that I'm sorry. I've written post before about how we have to hurt our children to help them and how sad a frustrating that is.


    (((hug)))

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  6. These are the twins with diabetes--http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bw6TbEMuCA&feature=related

    I had seen their video b/c it came up as a related hit for the little boy whose team I walked for. Then I recognized the mom at the walk. (Hard to miss two adorable twin red-headed boys!) Debated on whether to say something to her or not, finally did. Always worried I'll say something "wrong" but I think I just told her I saw her video and hang in there.

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  7. Joanne, Have you heard of Inject-Ease? It's a device used for people who are squeamish about injections. Check out this link
    http://www.palcolabs.com/section_products/injectease.html
    It may help Elise with her fear of the needle. I have one just sitting around in a cabinet if you're interested :)
    Deborah

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