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Friday, November 11, 2011

Lest we Forget

Growing up in Canada, November 11th (Remembrance Day) was a time that we would reflect and give thanks to those who gave their lives for our country.

There was always an assembly at school (usually the day before, since Remembrance Day is a day off), marked by the reading of In Flanders Fields (see below), and the playing of Last Post. This was followed by two minutes of silence at 11:00 am (the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month), the time the Armistice of World War I was signed in 1918. To this day, the sound of a lone trumpet makes me want to bow my head and stand silent.

We wear poppies on our lapel to honour our veterans; a symbol of the famous poem In Flanders Fields which was written by a Canadian during WWI. To read more about the history of the poem, you can go here.

I thought it appropriate to post the poem today, in Remembrance of all who died so we could live free.


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
— Lt.-Col. John McCrae (1872 - 1918)

6 comments:

  1. I love it! Nice to see something about Vetran's today, I know it's all about D Awarness Month for us D-mom's but today it's all about the Vetrans too.

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  2. It's nice to remember all of our veterans.
    Thanks!

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  3. Thanks for that, I'm catching up on all my reading late so only seeing it now. We've a bit of a strange relationship here in Ireland with Armistice Day, but its becoming more acceptable to remember it now; my great grandfather fought in WW1 and my dad remembers the mental scars he had for the rest of his life. We visited northen France recently and its hard to imagine the horror those men went through in what is now beautiful countryside.

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